11.08.2010

The Post-stitch Post

Well, the poll I began last week is nearly over, and 5 out of 6 who voted said, "Yes!  I would love [a post-stitch tutorial]!"  So, here it is...


Just in case the video isn't very clear (since I have a very non-fabulous camera, yes, I used my still-camera's video setting for this, and it was not allowing for a clear picture really close-up) I have included a couple of still pictures.
The first picture here is how things will look when you insert your hook to work a Front Post Double Crochet, usually abbreviated "Fpdc".  You insert your hook from the front side of the fabric to the back on the right side of the post of the designated stitch, and then go across the post, and go back through the fabric to the right side on the left side of the post.  Then yarn over, and pull up a loop, then yarn over and pull through 2 loops, yarn over and pull through 2 remaining loops.  So the only difference between a post-stitch, and a regular stitch, is that you work it around the post instead of into the tops of the stitches.
This photo shows how things should look when you are inserting your hook for a Back Post Double Crochet, usually abbreviated "Bpdc".  You insert your hook from the back side of the fabric to the front side on the right of the post of the designated stitch, then go across the post, and back through the fabric to the back of the fabric on the left side of the post.  Then work just as for the Front Post Double Crochet, or a regular double crochet.

Typically, when working cables or ribbing, the non-post stitches are shorter than the post-stitches.  In this example, my post-stitches are double crochet, but you can work any stitch as a post-stitch.  I've never seen single crochet post-stitches in a pattern, and I think you would get some very unusual fabric working that way.  Often, when working intricate cables, the non-post stitches are half-double crochet, and the post-stitches are double and treble crochet, depending on how slanted they are.  The reason for the different sizes is that the bottom of the post-stitch is lower than the bottom of all the non-post stitches in the row.  In order to make the tops of all the stitches in the row more-or-less even, the post-stitches need to be longer to make up the distance. 

For examples of projects with post stitches, I will place a few links here:

- My "Rugged Warmth Winter Set" uses post-stitches to create a thick fabric and decorative ridges.   
- My "Beautiful Arches Bolero" uses post-stitches to make a ribbed edging that is crocheted right onto the constructed pieces.
- Ellen Gormley's "Sunny Spread" from Crochet Today Jan/Feb 2008 uses post-stitches beautifully!  You'll just have to look at the pictures to see how it looks.
- Drew Emborsky's "Saugatuck Summer" from Crochet It. Love It. Wear It.  (Drew by the way, uses lots of post-stitches in his designing) uses post-stitches all over to create a ribbed look.
- Fana Goberstein's "Brenda's Basketweave Bag" from Interweave Crochet Accessories 2010 uses post-stitches to make a very nice basketweave pattern.  This is a very clever stitch combination!
- Doris Chan's "One for All Family of Mitts" also from Interweave Crochet, Accessories 2010 uses post-stitches to make a simple deorative cable.

If you've never tried post-stitches before, now you are ready to give it a shot!  Go for it!  I hope that this answered your questions about post-stitches.  If not, leave me a comment with your question and I'll do my best to answer it for you.  Happy (post-)stitching!

April :) 

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